Let’s Talk Politics: “Not My President”

I’d like to take a moment to briefly reflect on my interpretation of “Not My President.”

Imagine your place of work, whether it’s an office, a kitchen, a retail shop, anything. You’re entry level, but make far more than any other entry level positions in town and have a lot of potential for growth if you continue at your job. Someone walks in, either to make a purchase, as an investor, or for an interview. You notice they’re wearing a cross around their neck. Out of his office, bursts your manager/boss. He screams at the man yelling that white Christians are not allowed in the store/office, pointing at the door and yelling at him to leave. He does this every time he sees someone with a cross. When the man asks why, he continues screaming, calling the man a murderer and telling him that his faith is wrong. He says that the man must be evil, citing the crusades in his tirade about violence. Now, you cannot leave your job, because if you did, you’d have no way to pay your rent or put food on your table for you and your child. You’ve considered leaving, but nowhere else in town is hiring or they cannot offer you as much as you’re getting now, and you’re barely getting by on your current salary, not to mention that you love your job, aside from your boss. Every time your boss does something like this, your respect for him gets less and less until you need a way to express that 1. You cannot respect him and 2. His views do not represent how you think or feel. You begin to say to yourself that he’s not the boss of you, shortening it to “Not My Boss” which you use in quiet retaliation.

With most people I have talked to that say “Not My President” they are not denying the fact that Mr. Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States, nor that they are a resident of the United States. Instead, they are trying to make a statement that his words do not define or represent them.

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